MENU

What Plants are Safe (or Dangerous) for Your Furry Family Members?

Harmful plants to Pets

Cheat grass - danger for petsCHEATGRASS

Why it’s dangerous

Cheatgrass is a prolific spreader, using barb-like seeds to grow just about anywhere. It reseeds every fall, so by the time spring and summer hit, cheatgrass has grown and started to dry out.

The barbed seeds get caught in pet fur and can work their way into ears, eyes, nose and even though your pet's mouth causing possible life-threatening infections.

What are the Symptoms

  • Irritation in paws, ears or eyes
  • Tilting or shaking head excessively
  • Tearing, squinting or discharge through the eyes
  • Excessive coughing or swallowing

What to do

  • After your dog/cat has encountered any cheatgrass, groom them thoroughly and if you can remove any barbed seeds, do so
  • Check paws, ears (inside and out) nose and month
  • If you see any of the symptoms arise, please bring your pet in right away.

FlowerBulbs-PetSafety4-2018

BULBS

Why it’s dangerous

Many homes and public gardens often boast beautiful bulb plants such as tulips, lilies, and daffodils. It’s not a widely known fact that bulbs are poisonous to pets, although lilies do contain insoluble oxalate crystals. Both dogs and cats will dig up the bulbs and either chew or ingest the bulbs.

What are the Symptoms

  • Dogs: Stomach problems like vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, acting erratically with an increase in heart and respiratory rate, even cardiac arrhythmias
  • Cats: Lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, seizures with a possibility of kidney failure

What to do

  • Make sure these flowers are inaccessible to your pets when they are outside
  • If you dig up your bulbs to store then, make sure they are out of range for your pet to find in the house or garage
  • If you suspect your pet has ingested any bulbed plants, bring them in right away

FERTILIZER

Why it’s dangerous

Fertilizers contain nitrogen, potash and phosphorous. In small quantities, they are generally harmless and don’t lead to poisoning. However, if consumed directly out of the bag, the concentrated amount could cause a lot of problems.

Fertilizer dangerous to petsOrganic fertilizers are often made of bones or feather meal, the smell of which may intrigue your dog to eat it.

What are the Symptoms

  • Drooling
  • Vomiting
  • Severe lethargy/collapse
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive tearing
  • Urination
  • Abnormal heart rates
  • Difficulty breathing (due to bronchoconstriction)
  • Tremors
  • Seizures

What to do

  • Contact your veterinarian or bring your pet in immediately.
  • You can also call the ASPCA Poison Control Center (888) 426-4435

INSECTICIDES

Why it’s dangerous

Insecticide dangerous to petsNon-Pet safe insecticides often contain the following ingredients that are considered very dangerous for your pet.

  • Carbamate insecticides
  • d-Limonene
  • Methoxychlor
  • Pyrethrins or pyrethroids

What are the Symptoms

  • Drooling
  • Gagging
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Paranoia or agitation
  • Tremors and seizures
  • Convulsions
  • Breathing difficulty
  • High heart rate

What to do

  • Try and estimate how much your pet ingested, then contact your veterinarian for the recommended treatment.
  • You can also call the ASPCA Poison Control Center (888) 426-4435

Bleeding HeartBLEEDING HEART

Why it’s dangerous

Bleeding heart plants (Dicentra Formosa) is high in alkaloids and isoquinoline—a convulsant. The roots and foliage of the bleeding heart plant are problematic for dogs, and humans as well—although Fido is more likely to try to make a meal out of a bouquet.

What are the Symptoms

  • Tremors
  • Loss of coordination
  • Drooling
  • Dermatitis
  • Respiratory distress
  • Seizures

What to do

  • Call your veterinarian for a course of action.
  • Or if your vet can’t be researched, contact Pet Poison Control at (888) 426-4435.

FoxGlove flowersFOXGLOVE

Why it’s dangerous

Foxgloves, on the other hand, contain toxins that can affect your dog’s heart. These toxins include cardiac glycosides. Interestingly, these toxins are used to create digoxin-a cardiac medication, which can be used by vets to strengthen and regulate a failing heart. For a heart-healthy pet, however, cardiac glycosides can cause severe heart issues.

What are the Symptoms

  • Weakness and collapsing
  • Drooling
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Frequent urination
  • Dilated pupils
  • Diarrhea
  • Tremors and seizures
  • Slowed pulse
  • Cardiac arrhythmias

What to do

  • Call your vet immediately if you think your dog has gotten into foxgloves.
  • Or if your vet can’t be researched, contact Pet Poison Control at (888) 426-4435.

ROSE BUSHES

Why it’s dangerous

Rose with thornsRose bushes are not toxic to pets, but thorns are the problem. Pets can easily get caught by a thorn if they’re running through your garden, and the resulting cuts can be deep enough to cause lasting damage. Watch out for cuts that could become infected and tie up climbing or large roses to keep them out of walkways. When you trim your roses, immediately discard of dead branches since the dried rose thorns are even more dangerous than live ones.

What are the Symptoms

  • Redness in the eye
  • Rubbing with paws
  • Squinting
  • Blood
  • Color changes
  • Tearing
  • Pus or mucous
  • Pupil size change

What to do

Contact your vet right away. Non-painful eye injuries should be seen within 24 hours, while painful injuries should be seen within hours if possible.


FoxtailFOXTAIL

Why it’s dangerous

Foxtail, after drying out, the barbs attach like glue to animals and humans as they pass through the low-lying brush. If these barbs work their way into the skin or they are ingested, the seeds don’t break down in a dog’s or cat’s digestive tract or Body. Because of this, they can cause significant issues, infections, or even death.

What are the Symptoms

An embedded foxtail grass seed will cause:

  • Abscesses
  • Swelling
  • Discharge
  • Limping or favoring a foot
  • Head shaking or tilting

What to do

Once a foxtail has embedded itself into your dog’s skin, it will take a professional to remove it, including anesthetic and a surgical procedure by your veterinarian.


FRUIT PITS (STONE SEEDS)

Why it’s dangerous

Most stone seeds contain cyanide, which is poisonous to both pets and humans. Pits can also cause obstructions inside your pets digestive tract. The pits can be sharp, which means they could damage the esophagus, stomach or intestines.

Peach with pitWhat are the Symptoms

  • Dilated pupils
  • Labored breathing
  • Excessive salivations
  • Dizziness
  • Seizures
  • Shock
  • Coma

What to do

  • Call your veterinarian for a course of action.
  • Or if your vet can’t be researched, contact Pet Poison Control at (888) 426-4435.

Poinsettias

HOUSE PLANTS

Why it’s dangerous

Heartleaf Philodendron is a common houseplant that is easy to care for. Philodendron’s contains a substance called calcium oxalate that is toxic to pets.

Poinsettias are a very popular Christmas plant which contains chemicals and saponins that may cause various levels of toxicity if injected in large amounts.

What are the Symptoms

HEARTLEAF POINSETTIAS
Pawing face Drooling
Respiratory distress Repeatedly licking the lips
Digestive problems Irritation to the skin, face, lips, or nose
Shallow gasps Red, itchy eyes
  Diarrhea
  Vomiting

What to do

HEARTLEAF:

  • Flush out the mouth, offer milk (or another source of calcium)
  • Give an antihistamine, such as Benadryl

POINSETTIAS:

  • If your pet has ingested a large amount of the plant, contact your veterinarian right away

Goatheads or puncture vineGOAT HEADS (aka PUNCTURE VINE)

Why it’s dangerous

Puncture vine is not poisonous to animals, and when they first sprout, look harmless. The problem arises when the vines mature and drop their Seeds. The seeds then dry out, become hard and when stepped on, will puncture the skin.

Often times a pet will try to get the burr/thorn out by biting at the skin. This will generally drive the burr/thorn deeper down.

What are the Symptoms

  • Limping
  • Biting a limbs
  • Whining
  • Bruising
  • Infections

What to do

  • Try and pull out the goat head with tweezers
  • If you’re not able to, take you them to the vet to avoid infection

Download this eBook to stay informed on how to keep your pets safe during the warmer months.

WPAPDM-COVER.jpg